Danish M23/38

General Information: The Danish Model 1923 is the most unique, and to some, the strangest looking combat helmet of the Second World War. No other country used a helmet like this. All of the M23 helmets were fitted with a Danish national coat of arms made of oxidized brass. The ostensible reason for the badge,Continue reading “Danish M23/38”

New Zealand MKII

General Information: The first soldiers who embarked from New Zealand during the Second World War arrived without helmets. They were supplied with British MKIIs and, in some cases, South African-made MKIIs. The New Zealand armed forces ordered helmets from Britain, but because of shortages, a decision was made to import 40,000 helmet shells from Australia.Continue reading “New Zealand MKII”

Yugoslavian M23

General Information: The Model 1923 French helmets exported to Yugoslavia were distinct from the M23 helmets produced for the French army in the interwar years.  Like the Spanish export French M26s they were made with inferior non-manganese, magnetic steel.  The export M23s also had a rolled rim, rather than a separate rim piece welded toContinue reading “Yugoslavian M23”

Greek M34/39

General Information: Contrary to popular belief in the collector community, the Greek Model 1934/39 helmet was produced entirely in Greece. The myth that evolved about this helmet was that the shells were produced in Italy under contract and sold to the Greeks prior to the outbreak of hostilities between the two countries. According to theContinue reading “Greek M34/39”

Czechoslovakian vz.32

General Information: The vz.32 was the main helmet used by Czechoslovakian armed forces up to the period just before the beginning of the Second World War. After the German occupation of the Czech portion of Czechoslovakia in March of 1939 and the dissolution of its army, the weapons and materiel of the Czechoslovakian army, includingContinue reading “Czechoslovakian vz.32”

British MKI Paratrooper

General Information: The British officially designated this helmet as the “Helmet Steel Airborne Troops Mark I” or “HSAT MKI” for short. Collectors generally refer to this as the “MKI Paratrooper” helmet. It was mainly produced in 1943 and most surviving examples bear that date on the liner. The helmet was issued from October 1942[1], soContinue reading “British MKI Paratrooper”

Australian MKII

General Information: The Australian Mark II was a domestically produced version of the British Mark II. The two helmets were very similar, but unlike its British cousin, the Australian MKII had a raw edge. The reason for this is that the company that produced the helmets, Commonwealth Steel Company, lacked the machinery necessary to bendContinue reading “Australian MKII”

US M-1C

General Information: The M-1C, officially designated “Helmet, Steel, M-1C Parachutists,” was an improved version of the earlier M-2 paratrooper helmet. It addressed the main deficiency of the M-2, which was the tendency for the “D” shaped chinstrap loops to break. The M-1C had had the same flexible chinstrap attachment device as used on the midContinue reading “US M-1C”

Model 1917A1

General Information: The Model 1917A1 was a modified version of the World War One Model 1917. It was the helmet worn by all branches of the US Armed Services in the opening months of the Second World War before the M-1 became widely available. The US Army issued a Field Service Modification Order in JanuaryContinue reading “Model 1917A1”

South African MKII

General Information: The South African Mark II was basically a clone of the British MKII. It can be readily distinguished from its British cousin by the three holes drilled or punched into the back rim. The purpose of the holes was to accommodate a neck flap, but there is very little period photographic evidence ofContinue reading “South African MKII”